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  • Article 2023-02-28

    Factors Affecting Turnover Intention among Married Nurses in Small and Medium-sized Hospitals

    Ju Won, Kim,1 · Hye Jin, Kim,2

    Abstract : Purpose: This descriptive study analyzed the factors affecting turnover intention among married nurses in smalland medium-sized hospitals with less than 300 beds. Methods: Data were collected from 177 married nurses located in K city from April 8, 2022 to April 21, 2022 using a questionnaire. Descriptive statistics, independent tests, one-way ANOVA, Pearson's correlation coefficient test, and multiple regression were analyzed using the SPSS/WIN 22 program. Results: Nurses rated items on a scale of five points. Their average rating for job satisfaction was 3.43±0.30, resilience was 3.51±0.38, and role conflict was 2.60±0.63. The nursing practice environment was rated 3.12±0.44, and turnover intention was 3.14±0.62 points. Age, job satisfaction, and nursing practice environment accounted for 25.1% of turnover intention (F=6.90, p<.001). Conclusion: To decrease married nurses’ turnover intention in small- and medium-sized hospitals with less than 300 beds, these findings can help develop a program that addresses the causes of high turnover amongst married nurses in local hospitals.

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  • Article 2022-08-31

    Influence of Emotional Intelligence, Job Stress, and Social Support on Resilience among Hospital Nurses

    Kyoung Hwa, Kim,1 · Kyoung-Mi, Kim,2

    Abstract : Purpose: The aim of this study was to identify the influence of emotional intelligence, job stress, and social support on resilience of hospital nurses. The study will provide the basic material necessary to improve nursing interventions for the development of nurses' resilience. Methods: The sample of this study comprised 193 nurses working at general hospitals in B City. Data were analyzed through the SPSS 25.0 program using ANOVA, t-test, Scheffé test, Pearson's correlation coefficient, and stepwise multiple regression. Results: The factors with the greatest influence on the level of nurses' resilience were emotional intelligence (β=.54, p<.001), social support (β=.23, p<.001), and job stress (β=-.11, p=.39). These factors had an explanatory power of 46.7% for resilience. Conclusion: To improve nurses’ resilience, the application and development of intervention programs to increase their emotional intelligence is necessary. Moreover, organizational management and policy are needed to reduce nurses' job stress.

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  • Article 2022-08-31

    A Systematic Literature Review of Shift Workers’ Sleep in Korea

    Yeon Hwa, Lee,1 · Young Ran, Yang,2

    Abstract : Purpose: The aim of this systematic literature review was to synthesize and investigate the effects of shift workers’sleep in Korea. Methods: A search was conducted through three electronic databases using keywords such as “shift work” or “rotation work” and “sleep”, with sleep as the independent variable, and 17 papers were reviewed. Results: The design of those 17 studies was analyzed in a cross-sectional analysis. The most commonly measured characteristic was quality of sleep, whereas the others were sleep disturbance, sleep efficiency, and sleepiness. The study outcome variables were job-related factors, mental health, wellness, stress, fatigue, and metabolic syndrome. Conclusion: The results inform sleep and health-promoting behaviors and improvement in shift workers’working condition.

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  • Article 2022-08-31

    Effects of Emotional Intelligence and Self-Leadership on Job Satisfaction among Physician Assistant Nurses

    Bo Mi, Jeong,1 · Yoon Goo, Noh,2

    Abstract : Purpose: This study aimed to identify the effects of emotional intelligence and self-leadership on job satisfaction among physician assistant nurses. Methods: The participants were 146 physician assistant nurses working at two university hospitals. Data were collected from August 1-September 31, 2020 and analyzed through t-test, ANOVA, Scheffé test, Pearson correlation, and hierarchical regression analysis using SPSS/WIN version 26.0. Results: Factors affecting job satisfaction were self-leadership (β=.30, p=.003), “less than 1 year of experience as a physician assistant nurse” (β=.27, p=.025), and emotional intelligence (β=.25, p=.007), and the explanatory power was 34.4% (F=6.03, p<.001). Conclusion: Our study shows that self-leadership and emotional intelligence play a significant role in the job satisfaction of physician assistant nurses; thus, strengthening these two factors is crucial to improve the nurses’ job satisfaction. The results of this study may serve as basic data for the development of strategies to enhance job satisfaction among physician assistant nurses.

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  • Article 2023-02-28

    Effect of Nursing Organizational Culture, Stress Coping, and Bullying on Clinical Nurses' Turnover Intention

    Hyo-Suk, Song,1 · So-Hee, Lim,2

    Abstract : Purpose: This study aimed to the investigate the relationship between nursing organizational culture, stress coping, bullying, and turnover intention among Korean hospital nurses; and to identify factors influencing turnover intention. Methods: The participants were 264 nurses working at three general hospitals in a metropolitan area in; South Korea. Data were collected using structured questionnaires from March 20 to June 21, 2021; and analyzed using the SPSS/WIN program. Results: Nurses' turnover intention was positively correlated with hierarchical -oriention (r=.28, p<.001), work -oriention (r=.14, p=.012), and bullying (r=.48, p<.001), whereas turnover intention was negatively correlated with relationship -oriention (r=-.41, p<.001), innovation -oriention (r=-.39, p<.001), and stress coping (r=-.09, p=.009). The factors influencing turnover intention were nursing organizational culture, bullying, age, position, and total working period; these had 44.0% explanatory power for turnover intention (F=14.00, p<.001). Conclusion: According to this study, addressing bullying and strengthening nursing organizational culture is essential to lower turnover intention among clinical nurses.

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  • Article 2023-02-28

    The Influence of Psychiatric Nurses’ Positive Psychological Capital, Empathy Ability and Stress Coping Style on Their Compassion Fatigue

    Eun Nyo, Bae,1 · Yongmi, Lee,2

    Abstract : Purpose: This study aimed to investigate the effect of positive psychological capital, empathy ability, and stress coping style on psychiatric ward nurses’ compassion fatigue. Methods: Data were collected using structured questionnaires for 140 psychiatric ward nurses. The data were analyzed using t-test, one-way ANOVA, and hierarchical regression. Results: The variable predictors of compassion fatigue were as follows: positive psychological capital (β=-.35, p<.001), empathy ability (β=.32, p<.001), and passive coping (β=.25, p=.004). These factors explained 27% of compassion fatigue, and psychological capital was found to have the greatest influence among these variables. Conclusion: Positive psychological capital, empathy ability, and passive coping are important factors influencing nurses’ compassion fatigue in psychiatric wards. It is necessary to develop interventions and appropriate coping styles that strengthen positive psychological capital to prevent and reduce nurses’ compassion fatigue in psychiatric wards. In addition, it is necessary to identify the required level of empathy ability to maintain a therapeutic relationship.

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  • Article 2022-08-31

    Middle-aged Female Workers’ Predictors of Psychological Well-Being Based on the Relationship between Positive Psychological Capital, Job Stress, and Job Satisfaction

    Ja-Sook, Kim,

    Abstract : Purpose: This study aimed to identify the predictors of psychological well-being in middle-aged female workers by examining the relationship between positive psychological capital, job stress, and job satisfaction. Methods: Data were collected from 145 middle-aged female workers. A self-report questionnaire was used to assess the level of positive psychological capital, job stress, job satisfaction, and psychological well-being. SPSS/WIN version 23.0 was employed for data analysis. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, t-test, ANOVA, Pearson’s correlation coefficient, and multiple regression. Results: The most significant predictors of psychological well-being in the participants were positive psychological capital, living standards, and hobby. These explained 39% of the variance for psychological well-being. Conclusion: We found that positive psychological capital, living standards, and hobby influenced the participants’ psychological well-being. Therefore, to improve middle-aged female workers’ psychological well-being, developing a program based on positive psychological capital management is necessary.

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  • Article 2023-02-28

    Effects of Hospital Ethical Climate and Communication Self-Efficacy on Nursing Cares Left Undone among Nurses

    Yoon Goo, Noh,1 · Bong Hee, Sim,2 · Eun Su, Lee,3

    Abstract : Purpose: This study aimed to identify the effects of hospital ethical climate and communication self-efficacy on nursing care left undone. Methods: The participants were 142 nurses working in a general hospital. Data were collected from July 18 to August 30, 2021. Data were analyzed by t-test, ANOVA, Pearson correlation, and multiple regression analysis using the SPSS/WIN 25.0 program. Results: (a) The mean value of hospital ethical climate was 3.54±0.41, communication self-efficacy was 5.03±0.81, and the sum of nursing cares left undone was 3.68±3.14. (b) Nursing cares left undone had a negative correlation with hospital ethical climate(r=-.25, p=.003) but not with communication self-efficacy (r=-.13, p=.116). (c) Factors that affected nursing cares left undone included education (≥master) (β=.23, p=.005), marital status (single) (β=-.19, p=.018), age (26~27) (β=-.18, p=.022), and hospital ethical climate (β=-.18, p=.029); the explanation power was 18.0% (F=8.66, p<.001). Conclusion: Our study shows that hospital ethical climate plays a significant role in nursing cares left undone of nurses. It is important to strengthen hospital ethical climate to lower the incidence of nursing cares left undone. These results may serve as basic data to help develop strategies for reducing the incidence of nursing cares left undone.

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  • Article 2022-11-30

    Influence of COVID-19-related Nursing Experience on Job Stress of Nurses

    Yeon Hee, Kim,1 · Hyun Sil, Joo,1 · Jeong Eon, Lee,2 · Mi Sun, Lee,3

    Abstract : Purpose: This study aimed to compare and analyze the job stress of nurses with and without in COVID-19-related work. Methods: A structured self-reported questionnaire survey was conducted to assess job stress. The extent of job stress was compared between nurses with COVID-19 (COVID-19 group) and those without such experience (non-COVID-19 group). Multiple regression analysis was performed to identify the factors influencing job stress. Results: Job stress was higher in the COVID-19 group compared to the non-COVID-19 group (t=2.54, p=.12). In sub-categorical comparison, stress driven by a taxing work environment, relationship conflict, and work schedule was higher in the COVID-19 group than the non-COVID-19 group. Multiple regression analysis revealed the job stress was higher among nurses with COVID-19-related work experience than that of non-experienced nurses. The factors affecting job stress of nurses with COVID-19-related work experience included emergency room work, providing nursing assistant for COVID-patients, and caring for these patients. Conclusion: Since COVID-19-related work experience is a major factor that affects nurses' job stress, it is imperative to provide various support measures for nursing assistants such as providing a break from working in an environment with high risk of infection, adjusting work schedules, resolving conflicts between personnel, and securing support.

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  • Article 2022-11-30

    Influence of Role Conflict and Professional Self-Concept on Job Satisfaction of Physician Assistant Nurses

    Eun Su, Lee,1 · Se Young, Kim,2

    Abstract : Purpose: This study is investigate the role conflict, professional self-concept, and job satisfaction degree of the physician assistant nurses, and to grasp the factors affecting job satisfaction. Methods: Data were collected from September to October, 2018 and 156 physician assistant nurses working at one certified tertiary hospital, four general hospitals, using self-report questionnaires. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, t-test, ANOVA, Scheffe's test, Pearson's correlation coefficient and stepwise multiple regression. Results: The degree of job satisfaction of the subject was 2.76 out of 5. The influential factors in the job satisfaction of the subjects were professional self-concept (β=.51, p<.001), and role conflict (β=-.29, p<.001), affected job satisfaction by 53.5%. Conclusion: In order to improve the job satisfaction of physician assistant nurses, the role conflict should be solved and a plan to form a positive self-concept should be sought. Therefore, through the identification of the roles that are appropriate to the situation in Korea and the legal and institutional positioning, they will need to be recognized and developed.

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May, 2024
Vol.33 No.2

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JKAOH Journal of Korean Academy of Oral Health