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  • Original Article 2022-05-31

    Male Nurses’ Experiences of Workplace Gender Discrimination

    Chang, Hyoung Eun1 · Woo, Chung Hee2

    Abstract : Purpose: This study was conducted to explore male nurses’ experiences of gender discrimination at the workplace using qualitative research methods. Methods: Participants responded to a survey using an online link, and were asked to describe their overall experiences by responding to the question “Please freely describe your experiences of workplace gender discrimination”. The qualitative data collected from 118 participants were analyzed using Krippendorff’s technique. Data collection was caried out from June 11, 2019, to August 3, 2020. Results: Eleven themes and 24 subthemes were extracted from a total of 277 meaningful statements. Male nurses’ experiences of workplace gender discrimination, reasons of gender discrimination, and improvement strategies were presented through the key themes. Conclusion: Male nurses experienced workplace gender discrimination from patients, colleagues, and institutions. Furthermore, strategies to improve gender stereotypes and to emphasize the strengths of male nurses are necessary in order to increase the number of male nurses in the female-dominant nursing field and to reduce job turnover. These strategies will help expand the social role of nurses as professionals and improve the work environment and benefits for all nurses.

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  • Article 2022-08-31

    Influence of Emotional Intelligence, Job Stress, and Social Support on Resilience among Hospital Nurses

    Kyoung Hwa, Kim,1 · Kyoung-Mi, Kim,2

    Abstract : Purpose: The aim of this study was to identify the influence of emotional intelligence, job stress, and social support on resilience of hospital nurses. The study will provide the basic material necessary to improve nursing interventions for the development of nurses' resilience. Methods: The sample of this study comprised 193 nurses working at general hospitals in B City. Data were analyzed through the SPSS 25.0 program using ANOVA, t-test, Scheffé test, Pearson's correlation coefficient, and stepwise multiple regression. Results: The factors with the greatest influence on the level of nurses' resilience were emotional intelligence (β=.54, p<.001), social support (β=.23, p<.001), and job stress (β=-.11, p=.39). These factors had an explanatory power of 46.7% for resilience. Conclusion: To improve nurses’ resilience, the application and development of intervention programs to increase their emotional intelligence is necessary. Moreover, organizational management and policy are needed to reduce nurses' job stress.

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  • Article 2023-02-28

    Factors Affecting Turnover Intention among Married Nurses in Small and Medium-sized Hospitals

    Ju Won, Kim,1 · Hye Jin, Kim,2

    Abstract : Purpose: This descriptive study analyzed the factors affecting turnover intention among married nurses in smalland medium-sized hospitals with less than 300 beds. Methods: Data were collected from 177 married nurses located in K city from April 8, 2022 to April 21, 2022 using a questionnaire. Descriptive statistics, independent tests, one-way ANOVA, Pearson's correlation coefficient test, and multiple regression were analyzed using the SPSS/WIN 22 program. Results: Nurses rated items on a scale of five points. Their average rating for job satisfaction was 3.43±0.30, resilience was 3.51±0.38, and role conflict was 2.60±0.63. The nursing practice environment was rated 3.12±0.44, and turnover intention was 3.14±0.62 points. Age, job satisfaction, and nursing practice environment accounted for 25.1% of turnover intention (F=6.90, p<.001). Conclusion: To decrease married nurses’ turnover intention in small- and medium-sized hospitals with less than 300 beds, these findings can help develop a program that addresses the causes of high turnover amongst married nurses in local hospitals.

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  • Original Article 2022-05-31

    Characteristics and Health Status of Outdoor Workers Exposed to High Temperature

    Lee, Bokim

    Abstract : Purpose: This study aims to identify general, workplace, and health-related characteristics of outdoor workers exposed to high temperatures, and to compare the risk of disease according to outdoor high temperature exposure. Methods: This secondary analysis study used the 5th Korean Working Conditions Survey (2017) to identify 4,915 outdoor workers exposed to high temperatures. Results: Outdoor workers exposed to high temperatures were mostly male, elderly, less educated, and daily contract workers. Most of them were engaged in agriculture, forestry and fishing, and construction industries. About 40~50% of them complained of musculoskeletal pain and overall fatigue. The results showed that high temperature exposure increased the risk of illness (hearing problem, skin problem, backache, muscular pains in upper and lower limbs, headache/ eyestrain, injuries, depression, and overall fatigue) among workers. Conclusion: High temperature exposure might increase the risk of illness among workers. The results of this study demonstrated that the outdoor workers should be protected from high temperatures.

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  • Article 2022-08-31

    A Systematic Literature Review of Shift Workers’ Sleep in Korea

    Yeon Hwa, Lee,1 · Young Ran, Yang,2

    Abstract : Purpose: The aim of this systematic literature review was to synthesize and investigate the effects of shift workers’sleep in Korea. Methods: A search was conducted through three electronic databases using keywords such as “shift work” or “rotation work” and “sleep”, with sleep as the independent variable, and 17 papers were reviewed. Results: The design of those 17 studies was analyzed in a cross-sectional analysis. The most commonly measured characteristic was quality of sleep, whereas the others were sleep disturbance, sleep efficiency, and sleepiness. The study outcome variables were job-related factors, mental health, wellness, stress, fatigue, and metabolic syndrome. Conclusion: The results inform sleep and health-promoting behaviors and improvement in shift workers’working condition.

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  • Article 2022-08-31

    Effects of Emotional Intelligence and Self-Leadership on Job Satisfaction among Physician Assistant Nurses

    Bo Mi, Jeong,1 · Yoon Goo, Noh,2

    Abstract : Purpose: This study aimed to identify the effects of emotional intelligence and self-leadership on job satisfaction among physician assistant nurses. Methods: The participants were 146 physician assistant nurses working at two university hospitals. Data were collected from August 1-September 31, 2020 and analyzed through t-test, ANOVA, Scheffé test, Pearson correlation, and hierarchical regression analysis using SPSS/WIN version 26.0. Results: Factors affecting job satisfaction were self-leadership (β=.30, p=.003), “less than 1 year of experience as a physician assistant nurse” (β=.27, p=.025), and emotional intelligence (β=.25, p=.007), and the explanatory power was 34.4% (F=6.03, p<.001). Conclusion: Our study shows that self-leadership and emotional intelligence play a significant role in the job satisfaction of physician assistant nurses; thus, strengthening these two factors is crucial to improve the nurses’ job satisfaction. The results of this study may serve as basic data for the development of strategies to enhance job satisfaction among physician assistant nurses.

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  • Original Article 2022-05-31

    Analysis of Factors Influencing the Intent to Stay among Military Hospital Nurses

    Yoon, Sook Hee1 · Ahn, Hyo Jeong2

    Abstract : Purpose: This study aimed to determine the effects of grit, nursing work environment, and job esteem on the intent to stay among military hospital nurses. Methods: This study employed a descriptive cross-sectional design. Data were collected from February 7 to 18, 2022 from 232 nurses working at four military hospitals under the Armed Forces Medical Command. The analysis was conducted using the SPSS/WIN 26.0 program, and descriptive statistics, t-test, ANOVA, Pearson coefficient correlations, and multiple regression analysis were performed. Results: Factors affecting the intent to stay included job esteem (β=.44, p<.001), total clinical experience of more than 10 years (β=.24, p=.001), and nursing work environment (β=.17, p=.009). Conclusion: The results can be used to ensure personnel quality at military medical institutions and can contribute to improving patient safety and medical services. Further, nursing managers need to formulate and implement strategies to foster a positive nursing work environment.

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  • Original Article 2022-05-31

    Effect of the Effort-Reward Imbalance and Job Satisfaction on Turnover Intention of Hospital Nurses

    Kim, Eun-Young1 · Jung, Se-Young2 · Kim, Sun-Hee3

    Abstract : Purpose: This study aimed to identify the influence of effort-reward imbalance and job satisfaction on turnover intention among hospital nurses. Methods: Data were collected from January 28 to February 10, 2022, from 237 nurses from five hospitals including clinics, general hospitals, and tertiary care hospitals located in B city. The collected data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, t-test, ANOVA, the Scheffé test, Pearson’s correlation coefficients, and multiple linear regression analysis, using SPSS/WIN 26.0. Results: The average of the effort-reward ratio, an indicator of effort-reward imbalance, was 1.67±0.66, and 86.5% of the participants had a value of 1 or more. The mean job satisfaction and turnover intention were 3.32±0.48 and 3.69±0.89 on a 5-point scale, respectively. Multiple regression revealed that factors affecting turnover intention among hospital nurses included effort-reward imbalance (β=.30, p<.001) and job satisfaction (β=-.32, p<.001), and these variables explained 29.0% of turnover intention. Conclusion: These findings indicate that effort-reward imbalance and job satisfaction are associated with turnover intention. Therefore, to decrease the turnover intention of hospital nurses, interventions and policies should be prepared to resolve the nurse's effort-reward imbalance and increase job satisfaction at regional or national level hospitals.

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  • Original Article 2022-05-31

    Nurses’ Organizational Silence in Hospitals: A Grounded Theoretical Approach

    Yi, Kyunghee1 · You, Myoungsoon2

    Abstract : Purpose: This study aimed to explore the constructs and context of hospital nurses’ organizational silence. Methods: In-depth interviews were conducted with 17 nurses in small-middle general hospitals as well as big university hospitals. We then derived the key themes using grounded theory method. Results: Nine themes and 30 sub-themes were derived: “Willing to be recognized for performance rather than saying”, “Getting used to the hard-to-speak climate”, “Face the reality that does not change when said”, “Complicated situation that prevents self-regulating decision-making”, “Conflicts that are difficult to confront”, “Unfair responsibilities that I want to evade”, “Leaders who don’t support me”, and “Being blocked in communication”. Consequently, the nurses learned to adopt a climate of silence and “learned organizational silence” behavior. They experienced that prosocial silence was essential for obtaining approval as a member of the group, and defensive silence for protecting themselves in the hierarchical structure and unfair responsibilities. Acquiescent silence originated from a futile relationship with their supervisors, one-way communications, and the unsupportive management system, in which three types of silence appeared sequentially or in combination with each other. Conclusion: Based on these results, nursing managers should identify the context of nurses’ organizational silence and should lessen these silence behaviors.

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  • Article 2023-02-28

    Effect of Nursing Organizational Culture, Stress Coping, and Bullying on Clinical Nurses' Turnover Intention

    Hyo-Suk, Song,1 · So-Hee, Lim,2

    Abstract : Purpose: This study aimed to the investigate the relationship between nursing organizational culture, stress coping, bullying, and turnover intention among Korean hospital nurses; and to identify factors influencing turnover intention. Methods: The participants were 264 nurses working at three general hospitals in a metropolitan area in; South Korea. Data were collected using structured questionnaires from March 20 to June 21, 2021; and analyzed using the SPSS/WIN program. Results: Nurses' turnover intention was positively correlated with hierarchical -oriention (r=.28, p<.001), work -oriention (r=.14, p=.012), and bullying (r=.48, p<.001), whereas turnover intention was negatively correlated with relationship -oriention (r=-.41, p<.001), innovation -oriention (r=-.39, p<.001), and stress coping (r=-.09, p=.009). The factors influencing turnover intention were nursing organizational culture, bullying, age, position, and total working period; these had 44.0% explanatory power for turnover intention (F=14.00, p<.001). Conclusion: According to this study, addressing bullying and strengthening nursing organizational culture is essential to lower turnover intention among clinical nurses.

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November, 2023
Vol.32 No.4

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JKAOH Journal of Korean Academy of Oral Health